Catalog: 2017–2018 Catalog Year

Course Descriptions

Philosophy (PHIL)

Liberal Arts Division

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Studies basic problems in different areas of philosophy such as ethics, political theory, metaphysics, and epistemology.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • Identify and explain the major branches of philosophy (e.g., metaphysics, epistemology, etc.); (GE 1)
  • Identify and explain philosophical language, individual philosophers and philosophical schools of thought; (GE 1)
  • Practice the Socratic method and other tools of analysis in oral communication in class discussions;
  • Critically analyze and interpret primary texts of philosophy; (GE2) and
  • Develop critical thinking in written communication by analyzing philosophical arguments and creating original arguments; (GE 2)

III. Topics

  • The Discipline of Philosophy
    • Metaphysics
    • Epistemology
    • Logic
  • Metaphysics & Epistemology in the Greek Period
    • Pre-Socratics
    • Socrates
    • Plato
    • Aristotle
  • Christian Eras
    • Augustine
    • Thomas Aquinas
  • Modern Metaphysics & Epistemology
    • Rene Descartes
    • Thomas Hobbes
    • Benedictus Spinoza
    • John Locke
    • George Berkeley
  • 18th & 19th Centuries
    • David Hume
    • Immanuel Kant
    • G. F. Hegel
    • Arthur Schopenhauer
  • Continental Traditions
    • Existentialism
    • Phenomenology
  • Pragmatic and Analytic Traditions
    • Bertrand Russell
    • Wittgenstein
  • Moral Philosophy
    • Epicureans and Stoics
    • Utilitarianism
    • Deontological Ethics (i.e., Kant)
    • Virtue Ethics (e.g., Nietzsche)
  • Political Philosophy
    • Plato
    • Aristotle
    • Hobbes
    • Natural Law
    • John Stuart Mill
    • Marxism
    • Liberalism

PHIL 102: Critical Thinking & Reasoning

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Covers nonsymbolic introduction to logical thinking in everyday life, law, politics, science, advertising; common fallacies; and the uses of language, including techniques of persuasion.

PHIL 114: Introduction to Logic

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Introduces symbolic logic. Studies the principles of correct reasoning, using the symbolic techniques of propositional calculus and basic quantifier calculus.

PHIL 135: Introduction to Ethics

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Provides an introduction to representative classical ethical theories.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • Identify and explain major branches of moral philosophy; (GE1)
  • identify and explain key concepts of moral philosophy; (GE1)
  • identify and differentiate between key philosophers of moral philosophy; (GE1)
  • critically analyze and interpret primary texts of moral philosophy; and (GE2)
  • research a significant social or ethical issue and create an original response to solving this issue. (GE2, GE4, GE6)

III. Topics

  • Developing Ethics and Moral Philosophy
    • What are moral questions?
    • The challenge of cultural relativism
    • Subjectivism in ethics
  • Identifying contemporary moral issues
    • Environment
    • Economic justice
    • Healthcare issues
    • Human Rights
    • Identity
  • Religion and Morality
    • Divine Command Theory
    • Natural Law
  • Virtue Ethics
    • Plato
    • Aristotle
    • Nietzsche
  • Thomas Hobbes and the Social Contract
  • Kant and the Categorical Imperative
  • John Stuart Mill and Utilitarianism
  • Feminism and the Ethics of Care
  • Ethical Egoism
  • Applying Moral Philosophy
    • Analyzing contemporary issues with different ethical theories
    • Creating solutions to contemporary ethical issues

PHIL 145: Religion in American Life

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

PHIL 180: Ufology

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: none

Surveys ufology in our popular culture as well as a presentation of ufological theories thought to explain the evidence for ufological claims. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

PHIL 200: Judeo-Christian Tradition

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Studies the major religious philosophical beliefs found in the Old and New Testaments, along with the ways these concepts were modified in post-biblical cosmology.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • Identify the major historical events and cultures that shaped the formation of Hebrew and Christian Scriptures; (GE1)
  • identify the major historical events and cultures that shaped the formation of Judaism, Christianity and Islam; (GE1, GE5)
  • identify and explain the moral, theological and philosophical themes of Judaism and Christianity; (GE1, GE5)
  • analyze and interpret primary sources from Ancient Mesopotamia, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; (GE2) and
  • research and critically evaluate one significant topic that relates to a significant contemporary or enduring problem in Judeo-Christian history or scriptures. (GE2, GE4, and GE6)

III. Topics

  • Ancient Mesopotamian Religions
    • Enuma Elish
    • Gilgamesh
    • Hammurabi’s Code
  • Biblical Criticism
    • Source Criticism (i.e. Wellhausen’s Documentary Hypothesis)
    • Historical Criticism
  • Origins of Judaism
    • Abrahamic Covenants
    • Akedah
    • Moses & Mosaic Covenants
    • Davidic Covenant
  • The History of the Divided Kingdoms
    • Judah and Israel
    • Assyrian Invasion
    • Babylonian Exile
  • Post-Exile Israel
    • Persian Influence - Zoroastrianism
    • Greek Influence
    • Septuagint
    • Maccabbees’ Revolt
  • Judaism before and after Roman rule
    • Factions of Judaism (e.g. Essenes & Dead Sea Scrolls, etc.)
    • Destruction of Temple & Diaspora
    • Rabbinic Judaism
    • The formation of the TANAKH
  • The Jesus Movement
    • Historical Jesus
    • Gospels and Early Christian Literature
    • Non-Canonical Gospels (e.g., Thomas, etc.)
  • Christianity before 325 C.E.
    • New Religious Movement (111 C.E.)
    • Gnosticism
    • Marcionism
    • Irenaeus
    • Persecution
  • Constantine & Early Christian Councils
    • Edict of Milan
    • Council of Nicaea
    • New Testament Canon
    • Council of Chalcedon
    • Eastern Fathers’ views on Trinity
    • Augustine on Original Sin
  • Rise of Islam
    • Life of Muhammad
    • Muslim Beliefs and Practices
    • Muslim Philosophers
    • Factions of Islam
  • Early Philosophical Perspectives
    • Maimonides
    • Thomas Aquinas
    • Averroes
  • Mysticism
    • Judaism - Kabbalah
    • Christianity
    • Islam - Sufism
  • Reform Movements
    • John Wycliffe
    • Martin Luther
    • John Calvin
    • H. Zwingli
    • Henry VIII

PHIL 203: Introduction to Existentialism

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Reviews readings from Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Jaspers, Sarte and Heidegger. An examination of the existentialist concepts: "being" and "nonbeing," "estrangement," "dread," "anxiety" and "freedom."

PHIL 204: Contemporary Philosophy

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Reviews the late 19th century movements as basis for the study of 20th century developments in thought from Nietzsche through existentialism, neopositivism, and American naturalism.

PHIL 207: Introduction to Political Philosophy

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Provides readings and discussion of theories concerning the nature of society and political structure from classical and contemporary philosophers.

PHIL 210: World Religions

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Examines the main moral and religious views of world religions.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • Increase their knowledge and appreciation of the world’s religions by differentiating how they name The Sacred; (GE1, GE5)
  • identify and distinguish the basic moral tenants, doctrines and religious practices of the world’s major religious traditions; (GE 1, GE5)
  • identify and distinguish myth, ritual, symbol, architecture and artistic expression among the world’s major religious traditions; (GE1, GE5)
  • analyze and interpret primary sources from the world’s major religious traditions; (GE2); and
  • create a project that synthesizes ideas from at two different disciplines (e.g. Anthropology, History, Philosophy, etc.) to address a significant contemporary or enduring problem related to religion. (GE2, GE6)

III. Topics

  • The Study of Religion
    • The definitions of religion
    • Elements of Religion
    • Religion from multiple disciplines (e.g., Anthropology, History, Psychology, Philosophy, Sociology, etc.)
  • Hinduism
    • Origins of Vedic Religion
    • Theology of Upanishads (e.g., Brahman, Atman, etc.)
    • Sacred Texts (e.g., Bhagavad Gita)
    • Yoga
  • Buddhism
    • Life of Buddha
    • Common Buddhist Teachings
      • Three Marks of Reality
      • Four Noble Truths
      • Five Precepts
    • Branches of Buddhism
      • Theravada
      • Mahayana (e.g., Zen)
      • Tibetan/Vajrayana
  • Taoism
    • Lao Tzu
    • Sacred Texts
    • Central Concepts
      • Tao
      • Wu-Wei
    • Branches
      • Philosophical
      • Religious
  • Confucianism
    • Life of Confucius
    • Sacred Texts
    • Five Great Relationships
    • Confucian Virtues (e.g., Jen/Ren, Wen, etc.)
  • Judaism
    • Covenants (e.g., Abraham, Moses, etc.)
    • Sacred Text (TANAKH).
    • History of Biblical Judaism
      • Divided Kingdoms
      • Destruction of Temples
    • Modern Judaism
      • Beliefs
      • Practices
      • Divisions within Modern Judaism
      • Christianity
  • The Life of Jesus
    • New Testament Literature
    • Common Beliefs and Practices
    • History of Early Christianity
    • Branches of Christianity
      • Eastern Orthodoxy
      • Roman Catholicism
      • Protestantism
  • Islam
    • The Life of Muhammad
    • Sacred Text
    • Early History of Islam
    • Common Beliefs and Practices
    • Branches of Islam
      • Sunni
      • Shiite
      • Sufi
  • Optional - New Religious Movements
  • Religion in the Modern World

PHIL 217: Introduction to the Study of Marxism

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

PHIL 224: Introduction to Philosophy of Science

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Studies philosophical problems and implications of historical and contemporary scientific inquiry, e.g. the nature of laws, theories, explanations, scientific revolutions, values, relations of science and society.

PHIL 299: Special Topics in Philosophy

Units (Credits): 1–3; Prerequisites: none

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

Physics (PHYS)

Liberal Arts Division

PHYS 100: Introductory Physics

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 120, MATH 126 or higher or consent of instructor

Introduces students to a broad range of concepts in physics from basic classical mechanics to modern physics. Students will conduct at least four experiments with many demonstrations performed throughout the course.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to general concepts in physics across a broad range of topics in physics. Upon successful completion of PHYS 100 (defined as a letter grade of C or better, 73% or higher overall score) learners will be able to:
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of concepts covering a broad range of physical phenomena.
  • Gather and interpret data through guided scientific procedures.

III. Topics

Topics include but are not limited to the following. The process of scientific inquiry, classical mechanics, wave mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, atomic physics, nuclear physics, particle physics, relativity, and cosmology.

PHYS 151: General Physics I

Units (Credits): 4; Prerequisites: MATH 126, MATH 127, MATH 128 or equivalent

Provides a course in physics for students in arts and science, medicine and dentistry, and agriculture. Emphasis is on mechanics, heat, and sound.

PHYS 152: General Physics II

Units (Credits): 4; Prerequisites: PHYS 151 or consent of instructor

Emphasizes light, electricity, magnetism and nuclear physics.

PHYS 180: Physics for Scientists and Engineers I

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 181 ; Corequisites: PHYS 180L

Explores vectors, rectilinear motion, particle dynamics, work and energy, momentum, rotational mechanics, oscillations, gravitation, fluids, wave properties and sound. Students must co-enroll in both lecture and lab to receive credit.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to introduce Newtonian mechanics with a basis in calculus level mathematics in preparation for further study in engineering, physics, and other sciences. Upon successful completion of PHYS 180 (defined as a letter grade of C or better, 73% or higher overall score) learners will be able to:
  1. Recognize and describe important characteristics of physical systems undergoing mechanical translation, rotation, and/or oscillation. (ISLO #1, #4, #6)
  2. Calculate quantitative predictions and draw qualitative conclusions regarding the motion, interactions, and configurations of physical systems undergoing mechanical translation, rotation, and/or oscillation. (ILSO #1, #3, #6)
  3. Examine a variety of physical systems and verify the behavior of parts of that system when subject to interactions with objects both inside and outside the system. (ISLO #3, #6)

III. Topics

This course introduces learners to Newtonian mechanics and its application to predicting the behavior of mechanical systems. Topics will include dimensional analysis, vectors, rectilinear motion, rotational motion, oscillatory motion, particle dynamics, rotational dynamics, work and energy, linear momentum, and rotational momentum. These fundamentals will be employed to help describe a variety of physical phenomena possibly including, but not limited to, universal gravitation, fluids, deformable objects, mechanical waves, and sound.

PHYS 180L: Physics for Scientists and Engineers I Lab

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites or Corequisites: MATH 181 ; Corequisites: PHYS 180

Explores vectors, rectilinear motion, particle dynamics, work and energy, momentum, rotational mechanics, oscillations, gravitation, fluids, wave properties and sound. Students must co-enroll in both lecture and lab to receive credit.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to reinforce concepts and practices in PHYS 180 while also acquiring skills in experimental design, data collection and analysis, and scientific writing. Upon successful completion of PHYS 180L (defined as a letter grade of C or better, 73% or higher overall score) learners will be able to:
  1. Produce valid hypotheses regarding topics in Newtonian mechanics. (ISLO #1, #4, #6)
  2. Design and implement experiments which can confirm or deny hypotheses. (ISLO #1, #6)
  3. Produce written reports about experiments and their outcomes. (ISLO #2, #3, #6)

III. Topics

Experiments in this course will address topics including, but not limited to, measurement and uncertainty, one dimensional motion, projectile motion, Newton’s laws of motion, friction, centripetal force, work and energy, impulse and momentum, and rotational dynamics.

PHYS 181: Physics for Scientists and Engineers II

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: PHYS 180 ; Corequisites: PHYS 181L, MATH 182

Explores electric fields, potential, current, dielectrics, circuits, magnetic fields, electromagnetic oscillations, thermodynamics and kinetic theory of gases. Students must co-enroll in both lecture and lab to receive credit.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to introduce electrodynamics, circuits, and thermodynamics with a basis in calculus level mathematics in preparation for further study in engineering, physics, and other sciences. Upon successful completion of PHYS 181 (defined as a letter grade of C or better, 73% or higher overall score) learners will be able to:
  1. Recognize and describe important characteristics of physical systems involving heat flow, entropy, kinetic theory of gases, electric charge, electric fields, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, and simple electric circuits. (ISLO #1, #4, #6)
  2. Calculate quantitative predictions and draw qualitative conclusions regarding the interactions and configurations of physical systems involving heat flow, entropy, kinetic theory of gases, electric charge, electric fields, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, and simple electric circuits. (ILSO #1, #3, #6)
  3. Examine a variety of physical systems and verify the behavior of parts of that system when subject to interactions with physical effects both inside and outside the system. (ISLO #3, #6)

III. Topics

This course introduces learners to classical thermodynamics and classical electromagnetism. Topics will include heat, temperature, thermal expansion/contraction, calorimetry, heat engines, entropy, the Coulomb force, electric fields, electric potential, capacitance, electric current, electrical resistance, magnetic fields,the Lorentz force, electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic waves, and simple AC and DC circuits.

PHYS 181L: Physics for Scientists and Engineers II Lab

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: MATH 182, PHYS 180 ; Corequisites: PHYS 181

Explores electric fields, potential, current, dielectrics, circuits, magnetic fields, electromagnetic oscillations, thermodynamics and kinetic theory of gases. Students must co-enroll in both lecture and lab to receive credit.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to reinforce concepts and practices in PHYS 181 while also acquiring skills in experimental design, data collection and analysis, and scientific writing. Upon successful completion of PHYS 181L (defined as a letter grade of C or better, 73% or higher overall score) learners will be able to:
  1. Produce valid hypotheses regarding topics in classical thermodynamics and classical electromagnetism. (ISLO #1, #4, #6)
  2. Design and implement experiments which can confirm or deny hypotheses. (ISLO #1, #6)
  3. Produce written reports about experiments and their outcomes. (ISLO #2, #3, #6)

III. Topics

Experiments and simulations in this course will address topics including, but not limited to, heat and temperature, thermal expansion, calorimetry, heat engines, the Coulomb force, electric fields, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, capacitance, and DC and AC electric circuits.

PHYS 182: Physics for Scientists and Engineers III

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: PHYS 181 ; Corequisites: PHYS 182L

Explores light, optical systems, relativity, wave aspects of particles, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, semiconductors, radioactivity, nuclear physics and particles. Students must co-enroll in both lecture and lab to receive credit.

PHYS 182L: Physics for Scientists and Engineers III Lab

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: MATH 182, PHYS 181 ; Corequisites: PHYS 182

Explores light, optical systems, relativity, wave aspects of particles, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, semiconductors, radioactivity, nuclear physics and particles. Students must co-enroll in both lecture and lab to receive credit.

PHYS 293: Directed Study

Units (Credits): 1–3; Prerequisites: PHYS 151, PHYS 180

Provides individual study conducted under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for up to six units.

Political Science (PSC)

Liberal Arts Division

PSC 100: Nevada Constitution

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: none; Recommended: Completion or corequisite of ENG 101 or eligibility to enroll in ENG 101.

Introduces the political history of Nevada through an examination of the Nevada Constitution. Satisfies the Nevada Constitution requirement.

PSC 103: Principles of American Constitutional Government

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Studies constitutions of U.S. and Nevada with specific attention to various principles and current problems of government. Satisfies United States and Nevada Constitution requirements.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • Demonstrate working knowledge of key concepts, principles, themes, and major content areas needed to explain and solve problems associated with American constitutional government. (Working Knowledge, GE 1)
  • Write effective projects, papers, and reports. (Written Communication, ISLO 2)
  • Locate, evaluate, and appropriately use information from multiple resources to complete projects, activities, and papers. (Information Literacy, GE 4 and ISLO 4)

III. Topic

Foundation of Government.
  1. American Government: Roots, Context, and Culture.
  2. The United States and Nevada Constitution.
  3. The Federal System.
  4. Civil Liberties.
  5. Civil Rights.
Institutions of Government.
  1. Congress.
  2. Presidency.
  3. The Executive Branch and the Federal Bureaucracy.
  4. The Judiciary.
Political Behavior.
  1. Public Opinion and Political Socialization.
  2. Political Parties.
  3. Elections and Voting.
  4. The Campaign Process.
  5. The News Media.
  6. Interest Groups.
Public Policy.
  1. Domestic Policy.
  2. Economic Policy.
  3. Foreign and Defense Policy.

PSC 208: Survey of State & Local Government

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none; Recommended: Completion or corequisite of ENG 101 or eligibility to enroll in ENG 101.

Surveys the the organization, working principles and functional processes of state and local governments in the United States, including Nevada. Satisfies the Nevada Constitution requirement.

PSC 210: American Public Policy

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none; Recommended: Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101, or eligibility to enroll in ENG 101.

Explores an analysis of the interplay of forces involved in policy-making at all levels of American government. Studies the impact of policy on individuals and institutions.

PSC 211: Introduction to Comparative Politics

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none; Recommended: Completion or corequisite of ENG 101 or ability to enroll in ENG 101.

Provides an analysis of similarities and differences in the governing processes of different societies.

PSC 231: Introduction to International Relations

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none; Recommended: Completion or corequisite of ENG 101 or eligibility to enroll in ENG 101.

Explores policy making institutions, foreign policies and politics of various nations.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  1. Identify important terminology, concepts, principles, themes, and major content areas in international relations. (GE 1)
  2. Write quality essays and assignments. (GE 2)
  3. Locate, evaluate, and appropriately use information from multiple resources to complete assignments and papers. (GE 4)
  4. Draw a conclusion about how to solve a significant contemporary or enduring international relations problem, and present a rational defense of the conclusion. (GE 6)

III. Topics

  • Trend and Transformation in World Politics.
    1. Exploring World Politics.
    2. Theories of World Politics.
    3. Theories of International Decision Making.
  • The Globe’s Actors and Their Relations.
    1. Rivalries and Relations among the Great Powers.
    2. The Global South in a World of Powers.
    3. Nonstate Actors and the Quest for Global Community.
  • Confronting Armed Conflict.
    1. The Threat of Armed Conflict to the World.
    2. The Pursuit of Power through Arms and Alliances.
    3. The Quest for Peace through International Law and Collective Security.
  • Human Security, Prosperity, and Responsibility.
    1. The Globalization of International Finance.
    2. International Trade in the Global Marketplace.
    3. The Demographic and Cultural Dimensions of Globalization.
    4. The Promotion of Human Development and Human Rights.
    5. Global Responsibility for the Preservation of the Environment.
  • Thinking about the Future of World Politics.
    1. Looking Ahead at Global Trends and Transformations.

PSC 241: Survey of Public Administration

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Survey of the role of executive agencies in governmental process. Attention focused upon bureaucratic procedures for planning, budgeting, utilizing personnel, communicating, and decision making.

Power Equipment Technician (PET)

Career and Technical Education Division

PET 108: Power Equipment Technician Motorcycle Maintenance II

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: PET 107 or consent of instructor

Continues PET 107. Introduces principles, design, construction and maintenance of motorcycles. Includes safety, use of manuals, selection and use of hand tools and hand-held test instruments. Introduces general maintenance of a variety of different motorcycle systems. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

Psychology (PSY)

Liberal Arts Division

PSY 101: General Psychology

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

PSY 101 introduces the field of psychology. Covers major principles and their application to the study of human behavior.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation of knowledge that allows students to further their study of psychology and/or apply knowledge to meet their personal and professional needs. The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of this course, learners will have demonstrated they can:
  1. Identify important terminology, concepts, and principles from the major fields and perspectives in psychology. (GE 1)
  2. Write quality essays and assignments based upon the American Psychological Association’s style manual (GE 2).
  3. Describe, explain, or apply selected concepts and principles from approaches and perspectives in psychology, including scientific principles and procedures. (GE 6).
  4. Draw a conclusion about a contemporary or enduring issue in psychology and support the conclusion with appropriate reasoning and evidence (GE 6).

III. Topics

The course introduces students to the major fields and principles of psychology: major perspectives, neuroscience, perception, consciousness, behaviorism, learning, memory, developmental psychology, cognition, intelligence, motivation, emotion, social psychology, personality, and psychological disorders.

PSY 102: Psychology of Personal/Social Adjustment

Units (Credits): 2–3; Prerequisites: none

Focuses on understanding and applying psychological principles and theories to personal development and human relationships.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation of knowledge about principles and concepts important to personal and social adjustment. The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of this course, learners will have demonstrated they can:
  • Identify important terminology, concepts, and principles from the range of topics important to personal and social adjustment. (GE 1)
  • Use and evaluate self-improvement strategies and activities. (GE 6)
  • Provide insights into their own behavior and mental processes (GE 6)
  • Write quality essays and assignments based upon the American Psychological Association’s style manual (GE 2).

III. Topics

Major topics covered include adjustment, personality, stress and coping skills, individual development, health, social thinking, communication, relationships, gender and sexuality, careers, disorders and psychotherapy.

PSY 120: The Psychology of Human Performance

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: PSY 101 or consent of instructor

Surveys the psychology of human performance. Explores the psychological, emotional, and strategic dimensions of human performance. Emphasis will be to provide students with a comprehensive background that they can apply to their own performance areas.

PSY 130: Human Sexuality

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Covers major topics in human sexuality such as gender, sexual anatomy, sexually-transmitted diseases, sexual response and disorders, sexual orientation, sexual coercion, and commercial sex.

PSY 210: Introduction to Statistical Methods

Units (Credits): 3–4; Prerequisites: PSY 101, SOC 101, MATH096 or consent of instructor

Develops an understanding of statistical methods and training in the useful presentation and interpretation of behavioral science data, including elementary computer use. Same as SOC 210.

PSY 220: Principles of Educational Psychology

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: PSY 101 or consent of instructor

Introduces the application of psychology principles of learning and cognitive development.

PSY 230: Introduction to Personality Psychology

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Introduces students to personality testing and the major approaches to the study of personality, including the influence of heredity, learning, the unconscious, etc.

PSY 233: Child Psychology

Units (Credits): 2–3; Prerequisites: PSY 101 or consent of instructor

Psy 233 explains the growth and development of children from conception through early adolescence.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation of knowledge about child development, including major theories, principles, research methods, and issues. The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  1. Identify important terminology, concepts, principles, theories, and models from the field of child development. (GE 1)
  2. Draw conclusions about the role of biological, cognitive, and socio-emotional processes in child development. (GE 6)
  3. Use materials from the course to design an approach or process that will either further the understanding of development of children or improve the welfare of children. (GE 6)
  4. Present substantially error-free prose based upon the American Psychological Association’s style manual in all written assignments and presentations (GE 2).

PSY 234: Adolescent Psychology

Units (Credits): 2–3; Prerequisites: PSY 101 or consent of instructor

Psy 234 explains psychological development during adolescence with emphasis on special problems in American society: drug abuse, pregnancy, and familial problems.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation of knowledge about adolescence, including major theories, principles, research methods, and issues. The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  1. Identify important terminology, concepts, principles, theories, and models from the study of adolescence. (GE 1)
  2. Draw conclusions about the role of biological, cognitive, and socio-emotional processes in adolescence. (GE 6)
  3. Use materials from the course to design an approach or process that will either further the understanding of adolescence or improve the welfare of adolescents. (GE 6)
  4. Present substantially error-free prose based upon the American Psychological Association’s style manual in all written assignments and presentations (GE 2).

PSY 240: Introduction to Research Methods

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: PSY 101 or consent of instructor

Introduces how hypotheses are objectively tested in the social sciences, including research design, data collection, and interpretation of results.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to research in psychology with an emphasis on a critical examination of research design issues. The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of this course, learners will have demonstrated they can:
  • Demonstrate working knowledge of concepts, principles, and terminology of the major research designs used in psychology. (GE1)
  • Review published journal articles with an emphasis on the evaluation of research strategies used in social research. (GE 6)
  • Select and defend research strategies that can be used to solve significant or enduring problems. (GE 6)
  • Correctly use the American Psychological Association (APA) style in all writing for the course. (GE 2)

III. Topics

Topics include scientific approaches to research, measurement and ethical issues in psychological research, correlational research strategies, case and clinical studies, observational research, survey research, core and specialized experimental designs, and overview of qualitative approaches.

PSY 241: Introduction to Abnormal Psychology

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: PSY 101 or consent of instructor

Covers causes, symptoms, and treatments of major psychological disorders, including anxiety, dissociative, mood, somatoform, eating, schizophrenia and substance-related disorders.

PSY 261: Introduction to Social Psychology

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: PSY 101, SOC 101 or consent of instructor

Examines how the presence of others influences thoughts and behavior, including research on close relationships, persuasion, stereotyping, aggression, and group dynamics.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation of knowledge about social psychology, including major theories, principles, research methods, and applications of social psychology to contemporary issues. The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they:
  • Have a working knowledge of key concepts, principles, theories, and research from social psychology. (GE 1)
  • Can correctly use the American Psychological Association’s style in all writing in the course. (GE 2)
  • Locate, evaluate, and use information relevant to assignments. (GE 4)
  • Present an approach for resolving a significant contemporary problem based upon principles and research from social psychology. (GE 6)

PSY 271: Psychology & the Family

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Explores the relationship of the individual and the family.

PSY 275: Undergraduate Research

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: PSY 101, PSY 210, PSY 240

Requires independent or collaborative research.

PSY 276: Aging in Modern American Society

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

PSY 280: Understanding Men and Women

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: PSY 101 or consent of instructor

Explores the similarities and differences between the sexes, the consequences of these differences for the individual and society, and how to analyze explanations of gender/sex related behaviors. The course fulfills the diversity requirement for the core curriculum at UNR.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation of knowledge about the importance of gender on individuals and society. The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they:
  1. Have a working knowledge of key issues, themes, and theories relevant to explaining differences and similarities between males and females. (GE 1)
  2. Can correctly use the American Psychological Association’s style in all writing in the course. (GE 2).
  3. Locate, evaluate, and use information relevant to assignments. (GE 4)
  4. Draw conclusions about the influence of gender on individuals and modern society. (GE 6)

PSY 285: Psychology of Love Relationships

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

PSY 299: Special Topics

Units (Credits): 1–3; Prerequisites: none

Explores special topics which vary across semesters. A maximum of three credits may be applied towards a WNC degree.



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