Catalog: 2017–2018 Catalog Year

Course Descriptions

Machine Tool Technology (MTT)

Career and Technical Education Division

MTT 105: Machine Shop I

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Introduces basic machine shop skills which include lathe operation, lathe speeds and feeds, precision measuring techniques, layout methods, band saw and drill press operations, and exposure to the science of heat-treating of metals. Shop safety and etiquette will be stressed. To develop entry level skills, MTT 110 is recommended. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 106: Machine Shop Practice I

Units (Credits): 1–2; Corequisites: MTT 105

Expands the student's manual skills by putting into practice the theories and user skills introduced in MTT 105. The emphasis will be geared towards a more practical, hands-on experience through the use of lathes, layout techniques, vertical and horizontal band saws, measuring instruments and some vertical mill work. Shop safety and cleanup are always stressed. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 110: Machine Shop II

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MTT 105, MATH 110, MATH 120, MATH 126 or higher or consent of instructor

Expands skills introduced in MTT 105 to an intermediate level and introduces further skills which include vertical mill, drill sharpening, speed feeds and some production methods. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 111: Machine Shop Practice II

Units (Credits): 1–2; Corequisites: MTT 110

Further develops student's manual skills by putting into practice the theories and user skills introduced in MTT 110. The emphasis will be a more practical, hands-on experience through the use of vertical mill work, layout techniques, vertical and horizontal band saws, measuring instruments and some lathes. Shop safety and cleanup are always stressed. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 230: Computer Numerical Control I

Units (Credits): 4; Prerequisites: MTT 105, MTT 110, COT 105, COT 204 or consent of instructor

Offers an introductory class to provide a basic understanding of computer numerical control. During this course the student is introduced to the axis systems, absolute and incremental programming, tool offsets, controller operation, and fixture offsets.

To better understand the CNC programming process, CNC II is recommended as a follow-up. Includes three hours lecture, three hours lab per week.

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 232: Computer Numerical Control II

Units (Credits): 4; Prerequisites: MTT 230 or consent of instructor

Provides a continuation of MTT 230 and offers the student the opportunity to gain practical experience for further development of their skills by providing additional information and exposure to more complex applications of machining including CNC programming, mirror imaging, polar coordinates, tool compensation, and threading and computer integrated manufacturing.

Includes three hours lecture, three hours lab per week.

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 250: Machine Shop III

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MTT 110, DFT 110 or consent of instructor

Expands skills introduced in MTT 105 and MTT 110 to a more advanced level by developing projects that emphasize tolerances, plan of procedure and blueprint reading. Introduces further skills for surface grinding and tool and cutter grinding. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 251: Machine Shop Practice III

Units (Credits): 1–2; Corequisites: MTT 250

Further develops student's manual skills by putting into practice the theories and user skills introduced in MTT 250. The emphasis will be a more practical, hands-on experience through the use of vertical mill work, layout techniques, vertical and horizontal band saws, measuring instruments and lathes. Shop safety and cleanup are always stressed. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 260: Machine Shop IV

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MTT 250 or consent of instructor

Concentrates on areas of interest leading to design of an advanced project emphasizing skills learned in MTT 105, MTT 110 and MTT 250. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 261: Machine Projects

Units (Credits): 1–6; Prerequisites: consent of instructor

Permits students to work on projects of their own choosing and/or explore areas of special interest under the direction of a college instructor. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 262: Machine Shop Practice IV

Units (Credits): 1–2; Corequisites: MTT 260

Allows students additional time to concentrate on areas of interest leading to completion of an advanced project emphasizing skills introduced in MTT 260. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 291: CNC Practice

Units (Credits): 2–3; Prerequisites: none

Develops computer aided manufacturing skills with hands-on instruction on how to design and prepare manufacture parts using CAD/CAM software. Safety and clean up are stressed. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 292: Computer-Aided Manufacturing I

Units (Credits): 1–4; Prerequisites: MTT 230, MTT 232, CADD 100 or consent of instructor

Teaches computer-aided manufacturing for two-and-a-half dimension axes (2.5D). Students learn how to design and prepare to manufacture parts on the mill and lathe using state of the art CAD/CAM software. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 293: Computer-Aided Manufacturing II

Units (Credits): 1–4; Prerequisites: MTT 292 or consent of instructor

Teaches computer-aided manufacturing for three dimension axes (3D). Students learn how to design and prepare to manufacture parts in full 3D for the CNC mill using CAD/CAM software. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MTT 295: Work Experience

Units (Credits): 1–6; Prerequisites: consent of instructor

Provides students with on the job, supervised and educationally directed work experience. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

Management (MGT)

Career and Technical Education Division

MGT 103: Introduction to Small Business Management

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BUS 101 or consent of instructor

Develops an understanding of the small business enterprise with emphasis on how such businesses are started and managed successfully, including planning, finance, marketing, administrative control, and other type of activities.

MGT 201: Principles of Management

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BUS 101 or consent of instructor

Studies fundamentals and principles of management; administrative policies, objectives and procedures, and problems of organization control and leadership.

MGT 201 is accepted in lieu of MGRS 301 (UNR) or MGT 401 (UNLV) upon validation of content and knowledge by approved College of Business examination, or satisfactory performance ("C" or better) in MGRS 352 (UNR) or MGT 452 (UNLV) during the first year of eligibility to enroll in the appropriate upper division business course at the University of Nevada, Reno or the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

MGT 212: Leadership & Human Relations

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BUS 101, MGT 201 or consent of instructor

Teaches understanding and managing human behavior in organizations. Central to the course is developing a better understanding of one's self as a leader and exploring some of the more effective ways of leading others.

MGT 235: Organizational Behavior

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BUS 101, MGT 201 or consent of instructor

Studies concepts, theories and case studies concerning the behavior of people in modern business organizations. Analyzes the internal organization structure, and managerial roles and functions, in the business and other goal-oriented institutions. Studies theory and design of organizational structure, impact of work flow, leadership styles, and control systems on human behavior.

MGT 247: Industrial Management

Units (Credits): 1–3; Prerequisites: MGT 201

Studies the operation of a manufacturing enterprise, concentrating on the economies of production. Introduces a grounding on analytical method early so that the broad problem areas of system design, operation, and control can be based on the analytical method. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MGT 283: Introduction to Human Resources Management

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BUS 101, MGT 201 or consent of instructor

Develops an understanding of the duties and responsibilities of personnel at the mid-management level.

MGT 295: Work Experience I

Units (Credits): 1–6; Prerequisites: none

Provides the student with a supervised and educationally directed work-based learning experience. Students apply classroom theory to the work place. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MGT 323: Organizational Behavior and Interpersonal Behavior

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: admission to the BTECH program or consent of advisor

Examines behavioral influences which affect productivity, organizational effectiveness, and efficiency including: perception, motivation, decision making, communication, leadership, organizational design, group behavior and coping with stress.

MGT 367: Human Resource Management

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MGT 323 and admission to the BTech program or consent of advisor

Considers theoretical concepts and practical approaches relevant to management systems and processes: recruitment, training, appraisal, compensation and labor relations. Emphasis on legal constraints and international management.

MGT 462: Changing Environments

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: admission to the BTech program or consent of advisor

Focuses on managing ethically in the changing cultural, economic, political, technological and global environments of business.

MGT 469: Managing Cultural Diversity

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: admission to the BTech program or consent of advisor

Provides an understanding of cultural diversity by studying the U.S. workforce. Emphasizes cultural differences in the workplace, valuing diversity, managing diversity in the workplace, and giving competitive advantages.

Marketing (MKT)

Career and Technical Education Division

MKT 111: Introduction to Merchandising

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Provides the knowledge necessary to buy merchandise profitably, with mastery of the role of the buyer in relation to other store personnel. This course provides skills in planning and figuring markups and expense control.

MKT 127: Introduction to Retailing

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Studies an overview of retail merchandising, including buying, pricing, selling, advertising, sales promotion and display principles.

MKT 210: Marketing Principles

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Covers the problems of manufacturers, wholesalers, and retailers in the marketing of goods and services. Students will develop a plan applying the marketing principles.

MKT 250: Introduction to International Marketing

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BUS 101, MKT 210 or consent of instructor

Introduces the various functions of marketing as they are performed in the international environment. Focuses on the problems and decisions facing management in international marketing. Considers the impact of difference in language, aesthetics, religion and business customs on marketing strategies.

MKT 261: Introduction to Public Relations

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BUS 101, MKT 210 or consent of instructor

Introduces the techniques of public relations for those holding supervisory or higher positions in management and marketing. Identifies the principles of creating and maintaining good public relations, including employee-employer relations. Customer-employee relations receive emphasis. Focuses on the programming of the total public relations effort and selecting of appropriate strategy, media and persuasive devices to accomplish objectives.

MKT 262: Introduction to Advertising

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BUS 101, MKT 210 or consent of instructor

Presents methods and techniques in modern advertising, providing information on the entire advertising process.

MKT 295: Work Experience I

Units (Credits): 1–4; Prerequisites: none

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

Mathematics (MATH)

Liberal Arts Division

MATH 100: Math For Allied Health Programs

Units (Credits): 1–3; Prerequisites: none

Reviews basic mathematics with emphasis on those skills that apply to calculating drug dosages. Includes fractions, decimals, proportions, percents, English, apothecary and metric systems of measurements. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MATH 110: Mathematics for Industry

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Covers fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios, proportions, measurement, geometry, and briefly, the fundamentals of algebra and right triangle trigonometry. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

MATH 120: Fundamentals of College Mathematics

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 96 or three units of high school mathematics at the level of algebra and above with a grade of C- or better or appropriate score on the WNC placement or equivalent test. MATH 095 with a grade of B- or better in lieu of MATH 096 requirement

Studies probability, statistics, business, finance and consumer mathematics. Course is broad in scope and emphasizes applications. Note: Appropriate score on the WNC placement or equivalent test may also meet the prerequisite.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • Identify and define key terms and concepts related to foundations and basic applications of probability, statistics, finance, geometry, and dimensional analysis. [GE1]
  • Demonstrate, through accurate calculations and symbolic operations, a basic working knowledge of probability, statistics, finance, geometry, and dimensional analysis in natural or social science applications. [GE1, 3]
  • Present reasonable interpretations and conclusions of quantitative analyses used to address contemporary or enduring problems in natural or social science. [GE3, 6]
  • Use critical thinking and creativity to select and apply recognized methods suitable for solving problems related to natural or social science. [GE6]
  • Produce a substantially error free written explanations of solving processes and conclusions. [GE2]

III. Topics

Probability and statistics, personal finance, geometry and dimensional analysis, trigonometry, applications in social science, logic.

MATH 122: Number Concepts For Elementary School Teachers

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 120 or consent of instructor

Introduces elementary problem solving with emphasis on the nature of numbers and the structure of the real number system. Designed for students seeking a teaching certificate in elementary education.

MATH 123: Statistical & Geometrical Concepts For Elementary School Teachers

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 120 or consent of instructor

Presents elementary problem solving with emphasis on patterns and geometric relationships. Designed for students seeking a teaching certificate in elementary education.

MATH 126: Precalculus I

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 96 with a grade of C- or better or three units of high school mathematics at the level of algebra and above with a grade of C- or better within the last three years, or appropriate score on the WNC placement or equivalent test

Provides a third course in algebra. Topics include: polynomial, rational and radical equations; absolute value and quadratic inequalities; relations and functions; linear, quadratic, polynomial exponential and logarithmic functions, their graphs and applications; and systems of equations.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • solve
    • linear, quadratic, radical, and fractional equations. (GE3)
    • absolute value and quadratic inequalities. (GE3)
    • systems of equations and inequalities (not necessarily linear.) (GE3)
  • identify functions and find inverse functions. (GE3)
  • graph, find slopes and equations of linear functions, use them in models. (GE3)
  • sketch the graphs of basic functions and transformations of them. (GE3)
  • graph polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and use them in models. (GE3&6)

III. Topics

Fundamentals of algebra, equations, complex numbers, linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions, system of equations and inequalities. Additional topics may also include: matrices, determinants, conic sections, counting techniques and probability, mathematical induction.

MATH 127: Precalculus II

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 126 or three units of high school mathematics at the level of algebra and above, or consent of instructor

Studies circular functions, trigonometric identities and equations, conic sections, complex numbers, and discrete algebra.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • solve right triangles and applications using trigonometric functions (GE3&6)
  • graph trigonometric functions. (GE3)
  • solve trigonometric identities and equations. (GE3)
  • use the Laws of Sines and Cosines to solve triangles with applications. (GE3&6)
  • compute vector sums and differences with applications. (GE3&6)
  • use DeMoivre’s theorem to find powers and roots of complex numbers (GE3)
  • graph polar equations (GE3)

III. Topics

Trigonometric functions and graphs, right triangle applications, trigonometric identities and equations, laws of sines and cosines, vectors, complex numbers, polar graphs.

MATH 128: Precalculus and Trigonometry

Units (Credits): 5; Prerequisites: MATH 96 with a grade of C- or better or three units of high school mathematics at the level of algebra and above with a grade of C- or better within the last three years, or appropriate score on the WNC placement or equivalent test

Studies relations, functions and their graphs, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions; analytic trigonometry; systems of equations and inequalities, determinants; conic sections; sequences and series; counting techniques and probabilities.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • solve linear, quadratic, radical, fractional equations, systems of equations and inequalities (GE3)
  • identify functions, find inverse functions, sketch the graphs of basic functions and transformations of them (GE3)
  • graph linear, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and use them in models. (GE3&6)
  • solve right triangles and applications, trigonometric identities and equations (GE3&6)
  • graph trigonometric functions and polar equations (GE3)
  • use the Laws of Sines and Cosines to solve triangles with applications. (GE3&6)
  • compute vector sums and differences with applications. (GE3&6)
  • use DeMoivre’s theorem to find powers and roots of complex numbers (GE3)

III. Topics

Fundamentals of algebra, equations, linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions, system of equations and inequalities, determinants, conic sections, counting techniques and probability, trigonometric functions and graphs, right triangle applications, trigonometric identities and equations, laws of sines and cosines, vectors, complex numbers, polar graphs.

MATH 176: Introductory Calculus For Business & Social Sciences

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 128, MATH 126 or equivalent or consent of instructor

Instructs students in fundamental ideas of analytic geometry and calculus. Includes plane coordinates, graphs, functions, limits, derivatives, integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Includes applications to rates, optimization, and interpretation of integrals.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • Identify key concepts and methods of differential and integral calculus and their relationships to applications in business and social science. [GE1]
  • Demonstrate, through accurate calculations and symbolic operations, a basic working knowledge of elementary calculus involving algebraic, logarithmic, exponential functions and applications in business and social science. [GE1,3]
  • Interpret the results of calculus based analyses toward solving contemporary or enduring problems in business or social science; and, express and present a rational defense for such conclusions. [GE3,6]
  • Use critical thinking and creativity to solve a unique problem related to business or social science. Produce a substantially error free written report with details and a summary of conclusions. [GE2,3,6]

MATH 181: Calculus I

Units (Credits): 4; Prerequisites: MATH 128, MATH 126, MATH 127 or equivalent or consent of instructor, or appropriate score on the WNC placement or equivalent test

Offers fundamental concepts of analytical geometry and calculus, functions, graphs, limits, derivatives, and integrals.

MATH 182: Calculus II

Units (Credits): 4; Prerequisites: MATH 181 or equivalent or consent of instructor

Teaches transcendental functions, methods of integration, conics, vectors.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • Evaluate indefinite and definite integrals using trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and power series. (GE 3)
  • Apply integration to find arc length, surface area, and volume. (GE 1)
  • Apply integration to calculate work, fluid force, centroid, and center of mass. (GE 6)
  • Evaluate limits using L’Hôpital’s rule, and evaluate improper integrals. (GE 1)
  • Test series (including power series) for convergence, and determine the interval of convergence of a power series. (GE 3)
  • Determine Taylor polynomials and Taylor series of a given function. (GE 1)
  • Apply the techniques of differential and integral calculus to curves in polar coordinates and parametric curves. (GE 3)

III. Topics

Limits, differentiation of elementary functions (including implicit differentiation), curve sketching, related rates, optimization, Newton’s method, integration (including substitution).

MATH 251: Discrete Mathematics I

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

MATH 253: Matrix Algebra

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 182

Introduces linear algebra, including matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvectors and eigenvalues.

MATH 283: Calculus III

Units (Credits): 4; Prerequisites: MATH 182 or equivalent or consent of instructor

Covers infinite series, vectors, differential and integral calculus of functions of several variables, and introduction to vector analysis.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • Apply the techniques of differential and integral calculus to scalar functions of several variables. (GE 1, GE 3)
  • Apply the techniques of elementary vector analysis to solve problems in two and three dimensions. (GE 1, GE 3)
  • Apply the techniques of vector calculus to solve problems in two and three dimensions. (GE 1, GE 3)

III. Topics

Scalar functions of several variables. Vector analysis, and vector-valued functions of one and several variables. Differential and integral calculus in two and three dimensions.

MATH 285: Differential Equations

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 283

Presents methods of solving ordinary differential equations with application to physical systems. Includes systems of equations, series solution, numerical solution, and Laplace transforms.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

Students who pass this course must demonstrate they can:
  • solve separable, linear, Bernoulli, and exact first order differential equations with applications (GE3&6)
  • solve second order, linear, homogeneous and nonhomogeneous differential equations with constant coefficients or equidimensional coefficients, with applications (GE3&6)
  • solve higher order differential equations. (GE3)
  • solve systems of differential equations with applications. (GE3&6)
  • use Laplace transforms to solve differential equations (including the Dirac Delta function). (GE3)
  • find power series solutions to linear differential equations. (GE3)

III. Topics

First order differential equations, linear second and higher order differential equations, systems of differential equations, Laplace transforms, series solutions, and applications involving fluid tanks, cooling, Newtonian mechanics, mechanical vibrations, and electrical systems.

MATH 299: Directed Study

Units (Credits): 1–3; Prerequisites: none

Provides individual study conducted under the direction of a faculty member.

MATH 330: Linear Algebra

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 283

Vector analysis continued; abstract vector spaces; bases, inner products; projections; orthogonal complements, least squares; linear maps, structure theorems; elementary spectral theory; applications.

MATH 90: Elementary Arithmetic

Units (Credits): 1–3; Prerequisites: none

Math 90 is designed to provide individualized instruction in basic math skills including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percents. This class is intended for students who need a review of whole numbers before studying fractions. Instruction is tailored specifically to each student's needs.

MATH 91: Basic Mathematics

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Provides the fundamental operation of whole numbers, fractions and mixed numbers, decimals, percentage, measurement and geometry. The course is intended to provide a thorough review of basics needed in future mathematics courses and in applied career fields.

MATH 92: Algebra Review

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: Previous success in Intermediate Algebra or Algebra II or higher algebra course.

Provides a review of algebra that will refresh previously taught concepts. Designed for students who have successfully completed Algebra II or Intermediate Algebra or similar course sometime in the past. Provides a condensed review of topics from Intermediate Algebra intended to help students place into the appropriate course via Accuplacer Exam.

MATH 93: Pre Algebra

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH091 or equivalent or consent of instructor

Prepares students for MATH 95. Helps students who have experienced difficulties with math to be introduced to the language and concepts of algebra. Provides a transition from self-paced, basic math to the quick pace required in MATH 95.

MATH 95: Elementary Algebra

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 93 or equivalent

Offers a first course in algebra. Topics include operations with signed numbers; algebraic symbols; evaluating formulas; operations with polynominal, radical and rational expressions; solving equations and application problems using algebra; and elementary graphing. Provides a foundation for the math used in business, science, engineering and related fields.

MATH 96: Intermediate Algebra

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 95 or one unit of high school algebra and one unit of high school geometry, or appropriate score on the WNC placement or equivalent test

Offers a second course in algebra. Studies polynomial, rational and radical expressions; linear, quadratic and polynomial equations; linear and absolute value inequalities; relations, functions and their graphs; systems of linear equations; and applications.

MATH 96D: Algebra Review for MATH126

Units (Credits): 2; Prerequisites: MATH 95 or appropriate score on the WNC placement or equivalent test, or one unit of high school algebra and one unit of high school geometry.; Corequisites: MATH 126

Offers a second course in algebra. Includes multiplying, dividing, and factoring polynomial expressions, solving polynomial and rational equations, algebraic techniques involving exponents and radicals, and systems of linear equations.

Mechanical Engineering (ME)

Liberal Arts Division

ME 198: Cooperative Training Report

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: enrollment in engineering program

Guides students in preparation of written reports based on cooperative program assignments.

ME 241: Statics

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: PHYS 180 ; Corequisites: MATH 182 or consent of instructor

Studies static force systems. Topics include resolution and composition of forces, equilibrium of force systems, friction and various constraints, moments of inertia, cables, beams, fluid static, and work.

ME 242: Dynamics

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: ME 241 or consent of instructor

Studies kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; relative motion; work and energy; impulse and momentum.

ME 298: Cooperative Training Report

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: consent of instructor

Focuses on the preparation of written reports based on cooperative program assignments. Required of all students on cooperative programs during the summer or other semester when on work assignments with cooperative program employers. Students are also required to present their work upon completion of their program.

Mechanical Technology (MT)

Career and Technical Education Division

MT 115: Applied Programmable Logic Controllers I

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: AIT 101

Introduces the concepts of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) and computerized control operations. Covers basic PLC programming by describing numbering systems, PLC memory organization, PLC programming software and PLC program logic elements.

MT 160: Hydraulic Power

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: AIT 101

Introduces the concepts of how to connect and operate basic hydraulic components and systems, read circuit diagrams and monitor system operation. Exposes students to key topics in hydraulic power and safety, principles of hydraulic pressure and flow, and hydraulic speed control circuits in a wide array of applications.

Metallurgical Engineering (METE)

Liberal Arts Division

METE 250: Elements of Material Science

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: CHEM 121

Provides an understanding of the internal structure of materials, the dependence of properties upon these structures, and the behavior of materials in service.

Music (MUS)

Liberal Arts Division

MUS 103: Voice Class I

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Teaches fundamentals of tone production, breath control and practical techniques involved in reading and interpreting songs.

MUS 104: Voice Class II

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MUS 103

Continues the skills learned in MUS 103.

MUS 107: Guitar Class I

Units (Credits): 2–3; Prerequisites: none

Studies basic guitar technique, and bluegrass, classical and rock styles. No previous musical training required.

MUS 108: Guitar Class II

Units (Credits): 2–3; Prerequisites: MUS 107 or consent of instructor

Continues development of skills learned in MUS 107.

MUS 111: Piano Class I

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Introduces the piano, including instruction in note reading, technique, theory and easy repertoire. Students work in a laboratory setting, each using their own electronic piano.

MUS 112: Piano Class II

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MUS 111 or consent of instructor

Provides a continuation of MUS 111, a class in basic piano technique and theory.

MUS 121: Music Appreciation

Units (Credits): 2–3; Prerequisites: none

Analyzes styles and forms of music from the Middle Ages through the 20th Century, and discusses musical instruments and major composers.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. By the completion of the class, the students should, with an accuracy of 75%:
  • Identify the representative forms, styles and major composers from all of the eras of music history. (GE 1)
  • Describe approaches in musical style that correspond to trends in art and literature (GE 1, 6)
  • Use critical thinking to aurally identify music by era. (GE 6)

III. Topics

  • Basic elements of music
  • Music through the Middle Ages
  • Renaissance Music
  • Baroque Music
  • Classical Music
  • Romantic Music
  • Music of the 20th Century, including neo-classical, jazz, rock, musical theater and avant-garde

MUS 124: History of The American Musical Theatre

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Cultural, musical and theatrical survey of musical theatre in the United States, from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. By the completion of the class, the students should be able to:
  1. Explain what makes scores and libretti effective, recognize character development and note the function of songs in integrated musicals. (GE 1, 2)
  2. Describe the various key players that create and present a live musical. (GE 1, 2)
  3. Identify the art forms that preceded the American musical and show their influence in current musicals. (GE 1, 2)
  4. Recognize major musical theatre composers throughout the last century and identify their major contributions. (GE 1, 2)
  5. Identify different types of musicals, including jukebox, concept and book musicals. (GE 1, 2)
  6. Discuss the plots and reviews of several current shows on Broadway (GE 1, 2, 4)
  7. Demonstrate the use of music and dance to develop plot and character in integrated musicals. (GE 1, 2, 6)
  8. Show how the early forms of musicals influenced current Broadway repertoire. (GE 1, 6)

III. Topics

  • Elements of a musical: script, score
  • Key Players in a musical: Composer, Librettist, Producer, Director, Choreographer, etc.
  • Foundations of the musical: Minstrel shows, Burlesque, Vaudeville, Extravaganza, Operetta
  • Shows before the Golden Age
  • Composers and musicals of the Golden Age, the fusion of music, dance and libretto in storytelling
  • Composers and musicals of the 70’s through today
  • Concept musicals, Jukebox musicals, Megamusicals, Corporate musicals

MUS 125: History of Rock Music

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

How cultural, social, political, and economic conditions have shaped the evolution of rock music. Familiarizes the student with the history of rock music from its origins in blues through contemporary rock styles. Prominent players and groups of each era will be covered, as well as sociological, economic and cultural factors that shaped the many styles of rock music. Extensive classroom listening and, if possible, demonstrations/performances from local rock musicians will enhance the student’s learning experience.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:
  1. List in chronological order the prominent eras and trends of rock music and identify the names and contributions of key rock music personalities. (GE 1, 2, 4)
  2. Describe the emergence of rock music from its beginnings as “Rock and Roll”and “Rock-a-Billy” to the present. (GE 1, 2, 4)
  3. Identify individual rock music styles; distinguish among the styles of rock in terms of music theory and conception. (GE 1, 2, 4)
  4. Discuss how cultural, political, and social elements are reflected in, and have influenced Rock music and find relationships between rock music and historical, social and economic factors of each era. (GE 1, 2, 4, 6)
  5. Describe and evaluate the role society plays in influencing the evolution of rock and roll. (GE 1, 2, 4, 6)
  6. Describe technological advances (e.g. multitrack recording, digital synthesis, MIDI, etc.) and the effect of these advances, pertaining to rock music and evaluate the influence of modern technology on musical instruments and recording techniques. (GE 1, 2, 4)
  7. Understand the impact this music has had throughout the United States and the world and present these teachings in essay form. (GE 1, 2, 4, 6)

III. Topics

  • Elements of rock music: the blues, jazz, country/western, Rockabilly, Folk Northern Soul, Southern Soul, Psychedelic Rock, Southern or Country Rock, Progressive or Art Rock, Punk Rock, Reggae, Pop of the 80’s, Metal Rock and the new Singer Songwriters of the current generation.
  • The Payola scandals of the late 50s and early 60s.
  • Key musicians in each genre starting with early blues and country up to the present.
  • History of each rock music genre and/or era.
  • Key songwriters and producers of each rock era.
  • Most important is discussion of American society and it’s relationship to and influence upon pop culture and music, from slavery to Jim Crow.
  • How rock music and rock musicians influenced American culture. From slang words to the Woody cars of surf pop culture and the psychedelic art of the late 60s and early 70s.
  • Motown, the sound of young America, and how Soul music was shaped by, and helped shape the Civil Rights Movement.
  • Psychedelic Rock, was the use of drugs by musicians and performers to enhance their music a good idea?
  • Punk Rock and it’s move back to the garage band idea of anyone can be a musician and away from the growing musical expertise of the Art Rock musicians.
  • The Growing monster of Heavy Metal and Hard Rock of the 70s and 80s and it’s influence on today’s Rock Music.

MUS 134: Jazz Appreciation

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Jazz music's evolution as an art form unique to the United States has both shaped and reflected the construction of our national identity. This course teaches how social and cultural events led to the development of jazz music from 1890 through the 1960's. Prominent players and groups of each era will be covered, as well as sociological, economic and cultural factors that shaped the many styles of American Jazz as evolved.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. By completion of this course, the student should be able:
  1. List in chronological order the prominent eras and trends of jazz music and identify the names and contributions of key jazz music personalities. (GE 1, 2, 4)
  2. Describe the emergence of jazz music from its beginnings as ragtime, swing, to “Be-Bop” to the present day “Smooth Jazz.” GE 1, 2, 4)
  3. Demonstrate an ability to identify individual jazz music styles, distinguish among the styles of jazz in terms of music theory and conception. GE 1, 2, 4)
  4. Discuss relationships between jazz and the historical, social and economic factors of each era. (GE 1, 2, 4)
  5. Describe technological advances from the early phonographs to modern multitrack recording, GE 1, 2, 4)
  6. Understand and discuss the profound impact this music has had throughout the United States and the world. (GE 1, 2, 6)

III. Topics

  • What is Jazz? It’s roots and definition.
  • The elements of Jazz; improvisation, Rhythm, Dissonance, interpretation, and Interaction.
  • The Instruments that play jazz: The Rhythm Section: Piano Guitar, Bass, Drums, Vibraphone, Organ. The Woodwinds: Soprano, alto, tenor and Baritone Sax, Clarinet, Flute. The Brass: Trumpet Cornet, Trombone, Flugelhorn, and Tuba.
  • Origins of Jazz: Ragtime, The Blues, and New Orleans.
  • The Great Migration of musician form the South to Northern US cities and the influence of organized crime on Jazz.
  • Early jazz piano, The Swing era to the end of The Big Bands.
  • What is Bebop and the revolution it created among jazz musicians?
  • Latin jazz.
  • Vocal Jazz from Billie Holiday’s Strange Fruit to Lambert, Hendricks & Ross’s Twisted.
  • The music of Miles Davis, Soul jazz, Jazz in odd time signatures and Funk jazz.

MUS 176: Musical Theatre Practicum

Units (Credits): 2–3; Prerequisites: none

Performance ensemble, centered on public performance of musical theatre literature.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. By the completion of the class, the students should, with an accuracy of 75%:
  • Interpret direction that uses theatrical terminology (GE 1)
  • Perform the songs for their character, using appropriate vocal style (belting, character voice or classical delivery) and diction (GE 1)
  • Perform the choreography necessary for their character (GE 1)
  • Analyze the character they are portraying and develop the appropriate posture, tone and facial expression to express that role (GE 1)
  • Use the songs and dances to interpret the story and dramatize the characters, as part of their investigation of an integrated musical. (GE 1)
  • Apply their understanding of the culture and history of the work to the development of their characters. (GE 6)

MUS 215: Technique of Songwriting

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Offers a practical course in composing pop music. Analysis of hit songs and discussion of songs written by the class. Each student will compose melodies and lyrics, helping the poet with music and the musician with poetry.

MUS 224: Special Studies in Music Literature

Units (Credits): 2–3; Prerequisites: pianists should be of intermediate level proficiency

Focuses in depth on a special topic in music literature. Topics might include Baroque, classical, romantic, or 20th century keyboard literature. Students will explore musical topics through both lecture and their own performance of representative works. Class may be repeated for up to six units.

MUS 233: Recording Techniques and MIDI I

Units (Credits): 2; Prerequisites: none

Covers topics such as the job market, mics, consoles, tape recorders, and special effects. Teaches concepts including signal flow, multi-tracking, EQ, signal processing, MIDI, mixing and mastering. Students will learn to turn a Mac or PC into a multi-track studio.

MUS 253: Jazz Improvisation I

Units (Credits): 2; Prerequisites: none

Introduces the techniques of jazz improvisation in a laboratory setting.

MUS 276: Musical Theatre Practicum

Units (Credits): 2–3; Prerequisites: MUS 176 Nine units of MUS 176.

A continuation of the skills learned in MUS 176. Students must complete nine credits of MUS 279 as a prerequisite. Each level repeatable up to 9 credits.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. By the completion of the class, the students should, with an accuracy of 75%:
  • Interpret direction that uses theatrical terminology (GE 1)
  • Perform the songs for their character, using appropriate vocal style (belting, character voice or classical delivery) and diction (GE 1)
  • Perform the choreography necessary for their character (GE 1)
  • Analyze the character they are portraying and develop the appropriate posture, tone and facial expression to express that role (GE 1)
  • Use the songs and dances to interpret the story and dramatize the characters, as part of their investigation of an integrated musical. (GE 1)
  • Apply their understanding of the culture and history of the work to the development of their characters. (GE 6)

MUS 299: Special Topics in Music

Units (Credits): 1–3; Prerequisites: none

Music: Applied (MUSA)

Liberal Arts Division

MUSA 101: Bass-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Provides a personal introduction to the study and performance of music for bass. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 103: Bassoon-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Introduces students to the study and performance of music for bassoon. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 105: Cello-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Provides a personal introduction to the study and performance of music for cello. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 107: Clarinet-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Introduces students to the study and performance of music for clarinet. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 109: Drum Set

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: none

Provides individual instruction in the technique and repertoire of drum set. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 111: Euphonium- Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Provides a personal introduction to the study and performance of music for euphonium. No previous musical training required. Class may be repeated for a total of 4 credits. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 113: Flute-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Introduces students to the study and performance of music for flute. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 115: Guitar

Units (Credits): 1–4; Prerequisites: none

Provides individual instruction in the technique and repertoire of the guitar. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 121: Horn-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Provides a personal introduction to the study and performance of music for horn. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 123: Oboe- Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: none

Provides a personal introduction to the study and performance of music for oboe. No previous musical training required. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 125: Organ-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: none

Provides individual instruction in the technique and repertoire of the organ.

MUSA 127: Percussion-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Offers private instruction in the study and performance of percussion instruments. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 129: Piano-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Considers performance and analysis of keyboard literature from various musical eras, instruction of keyboard technique and application of basic music theory to piano literature. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 131: Saxophone-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Introduces students to the study and performance of music for saxophone. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 135: Trombone-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Provides a personal introduction to the study and performance of music for trombone. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 137: Trumpet-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Provides a personal introduction to the study and performance of music for trumpet. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 139: Tuba-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Provides a personal introduction to the study and performance of music for tuba. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 141: Viola-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Provides a personal introduction to the study and performance of music for viola. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 143: Violin-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Provides a personal introduction to the study and performance of music for violin. Class may be repeated for a total of four units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 145: Voice-Lower Division

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Introduces the correct and pleasing use of the singing voice through a well balanced and coordinated study of vocal literature and exercises. Class may be repeated for a total of nine units. Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.Fee covers cost of 14 half-hour private lessons.

MUSA 146: Voice II

Units (Credits): 1–2; Prerequisites: none

Continues development of correct and pleasing use of the voice for singers through study of vocal literature and exercises.

Music: Ensemble (MUSE)

Liberal Arts Division

MUSE 101: Concert Choir

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: none

Study and performance of representative choral music of all periods. Choir is featured in concerts throughout the WNC service area. May be repeated for a total of four units.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. By the completion of the class, the students should, with 75% accuracy:
  • Hold a harmony line in an ensemble (GE 1)
  • Perform with correct posture and attitude (GE 1)
  • Follow a conductor (GE 1)
  • Identify stylistic differences between choral selections from various eras (GE 1)

MUSE 131: Jazz Ensemble

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: intermediate proficiency on a band instrument

Introduces study and performance of instrumental jazz ensemble literature. Formerly MUS 230. Class may be repeated for a total of four credits. Prerequisite: intermediate proficiency on a band instrument.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. By the completion of the class, the students should, with an accuracy of 75%:
  1. Demonstrate professional ethics and conduct through prompt and accurate preparation of assigned repertoire and adherence to attendance policy.
  2. Discuss appropriate techniques for interacting within a small jazz group.
  3. Improvise by memory over chord changes (GE 1)
  4. Perform instrumental repertoire from jazz, rock, blues and the American Songbook. (GE 1)
  5. Demonstrate expressive competency of articulation, phrasing and pacing. (GE 1)

MUSE 135: Jazz Vocal Ensemble

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: instrumentalists should be of intermediate level proficiency. No prerequisites for vocalists

Explores a variety of styles, including pop, rock and jazz. Formerly MUS 115. Class may be repeated for a total of eight credits. No prerequisites.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. By the completion of the class, the students should, with an accuracy of 75%:
  1. Sing in various styles, including pop, rock and jazz. (GE 1)
  2. Demonstrate expressive competency of articulation, phrasing and pacing. (GE 1)
  3. Perform instrumental repertoire form jazz, rock, blues and the American Songbook. (GE 1)
  4. Demonstrate professional ethics and conduct through prompt and accurate preparation of assigned repertoire and adherence to attendance policy.



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