Catalog: 2017–2018 Catalog Year

Course Descriptions

Biology (BIOL)

Liberal Arts Division

BIOL 100: General Biology For Non-Science Majors

Units (Credits): 3–4; Prerequisites: MATH 120, MATH 126 or higher or consent of instructor

Covers fundamental concepts and theories of life science. Major topics include cellular/molecular biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, evolution and ecology. Includes four laboratory experiences.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of BIOL 100 General Biology for Non-Science Majors, (defined as a 75% course score or better) learners will be able to:
  • Explain the major characteristics of science, including that it is a particular way of knowing that seeks natural causes for phenomena and depends on observations that can be confirmed; that it is evidence-based and ideas can change in response to new evidence; how it, and biology in particular, have affected humanity (GE #1);
  • Explain the difference between scientific vs. non-scientific ideas, and evaluate secondary sources of scientific information for evidence-based credibility and scientific accuracy (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the fundamental concepts and theories associated with the properties of life, biological molecules, cells, genetics, populations and ecology, and evolution (GE #1);
  • Present accurate calculation and symbolic operations, and explain how such calculations and operations are used in either introductory biology or in interpreting information in related fields. (GE #1, #3).

III. Topics

All students will have a basic (one semester of a non-traditionally-lab-experienced one-semester course) knowledge of a survey of the basic processes of biology common to all life forms. Includes cell theory and metabolic processes, evolution, ecology, genetics, populations, and the scientific method. Designed for the non-science major. Meets the UNR core curriculum science requirement.

BIOL 113: Life in the Oceans

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Introduces the plants, animals and microorganisms of the oceans with an emphasis on important marine ecosystems such as intertidal zones, estuaries and coral reefs.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of BIOL 113 Life in the Oceans, (defined as a 75% course score or better) learners will be able to:
  • Demonstrate working knowledge of key concepts, principles, themes, and major content areas needed to explain and solve Life in the Oceans-specific problems and/or issues. (GE #1);
  • Explain the difference between scientific vs. non-scientific ideas, and evaluate secondary sources of scientific information for evidence-based credibility and scientific accuracy (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the fundamental concepts and theories associated with Life in the Oceans (GE #1);
  • Present accurate calculation and symbolic operations, and explain how such calculations and operations are used in either Life in the Oceans or in interpreting information in related oceanographic fields. (GE #1, #3).

III. Topics

All students will have a basic knowledge of the environment and inhabitants of the sea to include, at a minimum, Origin of the Oceans, The Sea Floor, Plate Tectonics, Chemical Features of Seawater, Winds and Currents, Waves and Tides, Climate Change, Marine ecology: Populations and Interactions and Energy flow and Trophic levels, Nutrient cycles, Ocean zones, Microbial organisms, Marine Invertebrates, Marine Vertebrates (cartilaginous and bony fish), Fisheries, and Marine Mammals.

BIOL 190: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: MATH 96 or higher (excluding MATH120) C- or better, or appropriate score on the WNC placement examination, or a corequisite of MATH 126; Corequisites: BIOL 190L

Covers the structure and function of cells. Included will be the major molecules of life, composition and physiology of cellular organelles, cellular metabolism, reproduction, motility, gene function and related topics. Note: BIOL 190/190L plus BIOL 191/191L transfer to UNR as fulfilling BIOL 190, 191 and 192 requirements.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of BIOL 190: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 190L: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, (defined as a 75% course score or better) learners will be able to:
  • Describe and explain the processes of cellular transport, signaling, metabolism, photosynthesis, cell division (mitosis and meiosis), heredity, gene expression and gene regulation and explain their significance to the functioning of biological systems (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the structure and function of animal and plant cells and sub-cellular organelles (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the function of biomolecules at the sub-cellular and cellular level (GE #1);
  • Draw conclusions from experimentally derived data in the laboratory (GE #1, #4).
  • Draw conclusions from experimentally derived data from the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory experiment (GE #1, #4).

III. Topics

All learners will have in-depth knowledge of the language of cellular and molecular biology, animal and plant cellular structure and function: Students will explain fundamental concepts associated with atomic structure, chemical bonding, water chemistry, and pH, and apply these concepts to the functioning of biological systems; Students will identify the basic structures and describe the functions of the four major classes of biological macromolecules and cellular structures, including eukaryotic organelles and membranes (and may include prokaryotic cells and viral particles, as well); Students will describe the processes of cellular transport, signaling, introductory intermediary metabolism, photosynthesis, cell division (mitosis and meiosis), heredity, gene expression and gene regulation and explain their significance to the functioning of biological systems; Students will apply scientific reasoning to draw conclusions from experimentally derived data from the Using a Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism to Predict Bitter-Tasting Ability laboratory experiment.

BIOL 190L: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab

Units (Credits): 1; Corequisites: BIOL 190

Covers the structure and function of cells. Included will be the major molecules of life, composition and physiology of cellular organelles, cellular metabolism, reproduction, motility, gene function and related topics. Note: BIOL 190/190L plus BIOL 191/191L transfer to UNR as fulfilling BIOL 190, 191 and 192 requirements.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of BIOL 190: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 190L: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, (defined as a 75% course score or better) learners will be able to:
  • Describe and explain the processes of cellular transport, signaling, metabolism, photosynthesis, cell division (mitosis and meiosis), heredity, gene expression and gene regulation and explain their significance to the functioning of biological systems (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the structure and function of animal and plant cells and sub-cellular organelles (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the function of biomolecules at the sub-cellular and cellular level (GE #1);
  • Draw conclusions from experimentally derived data in the laboratory (GE #1, #4).
  • Draw conclusions from experimentally derived data from the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory experiment (GE #1, #4).

III. Topics

All learners will have in-depth knowledge of the language of cellular and molecular biology, animal and plant cellular structure and function: Students will explain fundamental concepts associated with atomic structure, chemical bonding, water chemistry, and pH, and apply these concepts to the functioning of biological systems; Students will identify the basic structures and describe the functions of the four major classes of biological macromolecules and cellular structures, including eukaryotic organelles and membranes (and may include prokaryotic cells and viral particles, as well); Students will describe the processes of cellular transport, signaling, introductory intermediary metabolism, photosynthesis, cell division (mitosis and meiosis), heredity, gene expression and gene regulation and explain their significance to the functioning of biological systems; Students will apply scientific reasoning to draw conclusions from experimentally derived data from the Using a Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism to Predict Bitter-Tasting Ability laboratory experiment.

BIOL 191: Introduction to Organismal Biology

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BIOL 190, BIOL 190L ; Corequisites: BIOL 191L

Combines the principles of botany and zoology into one course. Topics include natural selection, ecology, populations and communities, characteristics of prokaryotes, protists, fungi, and comparative life processes in plants and animals. Note: BIOL 190/190L plus BIOL 191/191L transfer to UNR as fulfilling BIOL 190, 191 and 192 requirements.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of BIOL 191 Introduction to Organismal Biology and BIOL 191L Introduction to Organismal Biology Laboratory, (defined as a 75% course score or better) learners will be able to:
  • Describe and explain the principles of classifying organisms (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the structural and physiological functions of organisms (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the concepts of ecology, evolution and speciation (GE #1);
  • Draw conclusions from experimentally derived data in the laboratory (GE #1, #4).
  • Apply the scientific method by designing a controlled experiment by collecting, graphing, statistically analyzing, and interpreting data (GE #1).

III. Topics

The distribution and abundance of organisms is determined by the interactions between other organisms and the environment; how ecological principles operate at the levels of the individual organism, the population, the community, and the ecosystem; the characteristics, phylogenetic diversity, and ecology of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms; the structure and function of animal and plants, and how they relate to environmental adaptations; the underlying mechanisms of evolution; the use of standard laboratory equipment in a safe and accurate manner; applying the scientific method; the major groups of organisms; classify the major groups of organisms within a phylogenetic framework; present scientific findings using discipline-standard formats.

BIOL 191L: Introduction to Organismal Biology Lab

Units (Credits): 1; Corequisites: BIOL 191

Combines the principles of botany and zoology into one course. Topics include natural selection, ecology, populations and communities, characteristics of prokaryotes, protists, fungi, and comparative life processes in plants and animals. Note: BIOL 190/190L plus BIOL 191/191L transfer to UNR as fulfilling BIOL 190, 191 and 192 requirements.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of BIOL 191 Introduction to Organismal Biology and BIOL 191L Introduction to Organismal Biology Laboratory, (defined as a 75% course score or better) learners will be able to:
  • Describe and explain the principles of classifying organisms (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the structural and physiological functions of organisms (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the concepts of ecology, evolution and speciation (GE #1);
  • Draw conclusions from experimentally derived data in the laboratory (GE #1, #4).
  • Apply the scientific method by designing a controlled experiment by collecting, graphing, statistically analyzing, and interpreting data (GE #1).

III. Topics

The distribution and abundance of organisms is determined by the interactions between other organisms and the environment; how ecological principles operate at the levels of the individual organism, the population, the community, and the ecosystem; the characteristics, phylogenetic diversity, and ecology of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms; the structure and function of animal and plants, and how they relate to environmental adaptations; the underlying mechanisms of evolution; the use of standard laboratory equipment in a safe and accurate manner; applying the scientific method; the major groups of organisms; classify the major groups of organisms within a phylogenetic framework; present scientific findings using discipline-standard formats.

BIOL 200: Elements of Human Anatomy & Physiology

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Provides students with an intense descriptive overview of anatomy and physiology with related, illustrative pathology and microbiology.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of BIOL 200, Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology, (defined as a 75% course score or better) learners will be able to:
  • Describe the anatomy and physiology of the 11 systems of the body (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the function of cell types in the human body (GE #1, #4);
  • Illustrate and explain the function of biomolecules in the human body (GE #1);
  • Draw conclusions of elementary (sophomore) level system pathologies of humans (GE #1).

III. Topics

All students will have a basic (one semester of a non-lab-based one-semester course) knowledge of the human integumentary, muscular, skeletal, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, pulmonary, digestive, urinary, immune, and reproductive systems, and their applications to human health, pathology and some fundamental applied microbiology (to each organ system).

BIOL 204: Elements of Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab

Units (Credits): 1; Corequisites: BIOL 200

Provides students with an intense descriptive overview of anatomy and physiology with related, illustrative pathology and microbiology.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of BIOL 200, Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology, (defined as a 75% course score or better) learners will be able to:
  • Describe the anatomy and physiology of the 11 systems of the body (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the function of cell types in the human body (GE #1, #4);
  • Illustrate and explain the function of biomolecules in the human body (GE #1);
  • Draw conclusions of elementary (sophomore) level system pathologies of humans (GE #1).

III. Topics

All students will have a basic (one semester of a non-lab-based one-semester course) knowledge of the human integumentary, muscular, skeletal, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, pulmonary, digestive, urinary, immune, and reproductive systems, and their applications to human health, pathology and some fundamental applied microbiology (to each organ system).

BIOL 208: Introduction to Human Genetics

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BIOL 190, BIOL 190L

Offers a basic science (Mendelian genetics, cytogenetics, molecular genetics) and detailed clinical case study and correlation-oriented (pedigree analysis, gene cloning, inborn errors of metabolism) course that demonstrates the principles of genetics/heredity in human health and disease. Strongly recommended for those pursuing pre-medical studies. Three hours lecture.

BIOL 212: Introduction to Human Genetics Lab

Units (Credits): 1; Corequisites: BIOL 208

Provides an opportunity to learn how to extract and amplify genomic DNA using the polymerase chain reaction; apply concepts of chemistry and evolutionary biology to study an organism they choose; identify a question involving their chosen organism and answer it using DNA technology; research and identify protocols and materials such as M-SAT primers specific to the organism they choose; subject data to statistical analysis and relate their findings to concepts of evolution. Three hours laboratory.

BIOL 223: Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Units (Credits): 4–5; Prerequisites: BIOL 190, BIOL 190L with a grade of C or better or CHEM 121 with a grade of C or better or meet nursing program chemistry requirement

Offers detailed study of cellular functions and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Primarily for physical education, pre‐nursing and other pre‐health majors. NOTE: For programs that require BIOL 223 and 224, both courses must be completed at the same institution if taken outside Nevada. May be repeated a maximum of two times within the last five years.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of BIOL 223, Human Anatomy and Physiology I, (defined as a 75% course score or better) learners will be able to:
  • Describe the anatomy and physiology of the tissues in the human body, the integumentary, skeletal (including the major articulations), muscular and nervous (to include the cranial nerves and special senses) systems of the body (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the function of cell and tissue types in the human body (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the function of biomolecules at the sub-cellular and cellular level in the human body (GE #1);
  • Draw conclusions from experimentally derived data in the laboratory (GE #1, #4).

III. Topics

All students will have in-depth (first semester of a lab-based two-semester sequence) knowledge of the human integumentary, muscular, skeletal (including major articulations), nervous, systems, and their applications to human health and some fundamental pathology to each organ system. In addition, all learners will have in-depth knowledge of the language of anatomy and physiology, the four major classes of biomolecules, cellular anatomy and physiology, introduction to tissues in the human body and introductory intermediary metabolism.

BIOL 224: Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Units (Credits): 4–5; Prerequisites: BIOL 223 with a grade of C or better

Offers a detailed study of the anatomy and physiology of the circulatory, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine and reproductive systems. Primarily for physical education, pre‐nursing and other pre‐health majors. NOTE: For programs that require BIOL 223 and 224, both courses must be completed at the same institution if taken outside Nevada. May be repeated a maximum of two times within the last five years.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of BIOL 223, Human Anatomy and Physiology I, (defined as a 75% course score or better) learners will be able to:
  • Describe the anatomy and physiology of the circulatory, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine and reproductive systems (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the function of cell and tissue types in the human body (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the function of biomolecules at the sub-cellular and cellular level in the human body (GE #1);
  • Draw conclusions from experimentally derived data in the laboratory (GE #1, #4).

III. Topics

All students will have in-depth (second semester of a lab-based two-semester sequence) knowledge of the human circulatory, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine and reproductive systems and their applications to human health and some fundamental pathology to each organ system, e.g., this may include lecture topics on elementary EKG interpretation and arterial blood gas interpretation.

BIOL 251: General Microbiology

Units (Credits): 4–5; Prerequisites: BIOL 190 & 190L with a grade of C or better or BIOL 223 with a grade of C or better or CHEM 121 with a grade of C or better.

Emphasizes the distribution, form, structure and physiology of microorganisms in laboratory. Develops the student's skills in aseptic procedures, isolation and identification. Three hours lecture/three hours laboratory per week. May be repeated a maximum of two times within the past five years.

II. Course Objectives and Linkage to General Education Program

The information in the parentheses after a course objective refers to the specific general education (GE) learning outcome that the objective meets. Objectives without this information are not linked to WNC’s general education program. Upon successful completion of BIOL 251, General Microbiology, (defined as a 75% course score or better) learners will be able to:
  • Describe the anatomy and physiology, pathology and fundamental therapeutic treatments of the different genera of micro-organisms (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the function of cellular and non-cellular types of micro-organisms (GE #1);
  • Illustrate and explain the characteristics of micro-organisms at the laboratory, sub-cellular and cellular level (GE #1);
  • Draw conclusions from experimentally derived data in the laboratory (GE #1, #4).

III. Topics

All students will have in-depth (one semester of a lab-based one-semester course) knowledge of microbial structures and the metabolic strategies, genetics, and ecology of prokaryotic microbes, eukaryotic microbes, and viruses using appropriate terminology; hypothetical or literature-based disease scenarios; scientific reasoning and the principles of disease prevention, pathogenicity, epidemiology, and host immune responses; and develop a plan of disease control or prevention; using proper aseptic laboratory technique to transfer, isolate, and stain cultured microorganisms, and then analyze their macro- and micro-morphological characteristics; to apply scientific reasoning to deduce the identification of or test hypotheses about microorganisms.

BIOL 275: Gross Anatomy Dissection

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: none

Introduces students to the dissection of the human body for scientific learning purposes in an intense, one semester lab course. Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS degree.

BIOL 299: Special Topics in Biology

Units (Credits): 1; Prerequisites: none

Building Trades Electrical (BTE)

Career and Technical Education Division

BTE 101: Building Trades Electrical Level I

Units (Credits): 5; Prerequisites: none

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

BTE 102: Building Trades Electrical Level II

Units (Credits): 5; Prerequisites: none

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree. Financial Aid will not pay for this course.

BTE 103: Building Trades Electrical Level III

Units (Credits): 5; Prerequisites: none

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree. Financial Aid will not pay for this course.

BTE 104: Building Trades Electrical Level IV

Units (Credits): 5; Prerequisites: none

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree. Financial Aid will not pay for this course.

BTE 105: Building Trades Electrical Level V

Units (Credits): 5; Prerequisites: none

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree. Financial Aid will not pay for this course.

BTE 106: Building Trades Electrical Level VI

Units (Credits): 5; Prerequisites: none

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree. Financial Aid will not pay for this course.

BTE 107: Building Trades Electrical Level VII

Units (Credits): 5; Prerequisites: none

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree. Financial Aid will not pay for this course.

Business (BUS)

Career and Technical Education Division

BUS 101: Introduction to Business

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Provides students a broad background about the modern business world. An important course for students who are considering choosing a business major.

BUS 107: Business Speech Communications

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Focuses on speech communication skills. Includes effective listening and feedback methods, voice improvement, group and team interaction, developing messages for positive and negative audiences, preparation and presentation of an oral report.

BUS 108: Business Letters and Reports

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: ENG 098 or ENG 099 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate score on WNC placement examination or equivalent examination

Develops letter and report writing skills including proper word choice, letter tone, and structure. Demonstrates how these skills are best used in business letters, memoranda, reports and other business documents.

BUS 109: Business Mathematics

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none

Reviews fundamental mathematical processes for the vendor and the consumer. Discounts, commissions, depreciation, overhead and interest rates are included. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

BUS 110: Human Relations For Employment

Units (Credits): 1–3; Prerequisites: none

Provides students/prospective employees with knowledge and understanding of self and others for effective interactions in the workplace. Emphasizes employability skills such as communication, work habits and attitudes, ethics, conflict management, motivation and problem solving. Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

BUS 198: Special Topics

Units (Credits): 1–6; Prerequisites: none

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS Degree.

BUS 271: Introduction to Employment Law

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BUS 101; Recommended: MGT 283

Provides a framework to develop productive and effective employers and employees in the workplace. Topics include federal and state labor and employment laws and how they impact employers, employees and the workforce environment.

BUS 273: Business Law I

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: none; Recommended: BUS 101, BUS 108

Teaches the nature and sources of law. Studies the court systems and law as related to contracts, negotiable instruments, sales, insurance, and agencies.

BUS 274: Business Law II

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: BUS 273

Teaches the nature and sources of law. Studies the court systems and law as related to contracts, negotiable instruments, sales, insurance, and agencies.

BUS 295: Work Experience I

Units (Credits): 1–6; Prerequisites: none

Note: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree. Non-applicable towards an AA, AB or AS degree.

BUS 299: Business Capstone

Units (Credits): 3; Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 45 units of requirements for an AAS in Business, or consent of instructor.

Concludes various business concepts introduced throughout the business program by merging acquired skills and concepts through the business plan with additional emphasis on job preparation and business ethics.



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